May I travel during pregnancy?

Most women can travel safely until close to their due date. For most women, the most comfortable time to travel is in the middle of pregnancy. Problems are least likely to happen during this time. During pregnancy, many women have concerns about seat belts. There is no question that you are much better off wearing your seat belt during pregnancy. The baby is very well protected in the uterus from trauma, but car accidents are the most common source of trauma during pregnancy. The most common reason for fetal death is maternal death, and maternal death is much less likely in mothers who wear seat belts. Both lap and shoulder belts should be worn at all times. The lap belt should be worn low on the hips, not over the uterus. Also remember that after delivery, an approved car seat must be in you car in order to take your baby home from the hospital. We recommend you not sit with your legs crossed and that you get out to walk every two hours. People also have concerns about flying during pregnancy. In general, there does not seem to be an increased risk for women who fly during pregnancy. Any woman who sits for long periods of time without getting up for a walk is at risk for developing a blood clot in her legs. For this reason, on flights over two hours, you should get up, stretch your legs, and take a walk up and down the aisle. Because of this, an aisle seat is usually advisable. Our office recommends that patients do not travel at all in their ninth month, and restrict travel to within two to three hours from home during their eighth month.

Patient Education

Pregnant! What not to eat.

You have probably heard that there are foods that should be avoided during pregnancy. Most of the restrictions are directed at avoiding mercury which has gotten concentrated in fish. The fish to be avoided are the predatory fish from the ocean, and include tuna, shark, mackerel, and salmon. In fact, most fish should... Read More

Influenza

Pregnant women are more likely to get seriously ill from the flu. Get your flu shot.   You should get vaccinated as soon as you finish the first trimester. (12 weeks). You will not get the flu from a flu shot. Any side effects you get are generally limited to soreness... Read More

Abnormal Pap Smear - Now What?

Many women will have an abnormal pap smear result at some point in their life. If you have had an abnormal pap smear, you will generally need to have a follow up pap smear within 6 months.  Potential results of a follow up pap smear are: - Your follow up pap smear... Read More

Mirena IUD

Mirena IUD's are plastic devices that fit inside your uterus and provide contraception. They have several advantages. First they are very effective with greater than 99% prevention of pregnancy.  The stem of the Mirena contains levonorgestrel, a part of many popular birth control pills. Second, once inserted, they are almost... Read More

Am I in Labor?

Labor at term is about trying to decide if it is time to go to the hospital. If it is timed properly, it will prevent frustrating visits to the hospital which result in going back home. Many women have described a  contraction as "The baby balls up". What is really... Read More

Hereditary Cancer Syndrome Screening Information

Anyone can be at increased risk for cancer based on their family history. This is especially true for certain types of cancers such as: breast, ovary, colon, endometrium (uterine), pancreas, and melanoma. The more unusual the timing of the cancer (early age onset) or prevalence within a family, the higher... Read More

Insurance

Major Insurance Providers Accepted

Aetna
Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Choice Care
Cigna
Geo Blue
United Healthcare
United Health One
US Health Group

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