Am I in labor?

For women at term deciding when to go the hospital is not always easy. Sometimes it will seem like labor and next thing you know you have been sent back home. Many times these frustrations are unavoidable. It can be difficult to tell whether labor is true or false labor. Your goal should be to get to the hospital when labor is advanced enough that your cervix will be dilating. If you are observed for several hours and your cervix doesn't change, you may be sedated and sent back home to wait. If this happens it doesn't mean you're not in early labor, and it certainly doesn't mean you're not in pain. It probably means you are still in prodromal labor, and that more time is needed to enter active phase labor. In general there is an easy rule to remember. 5:1:1 Your contractions should be 5 minutes apart (or closer), lasting for 1 minute, for 1 hour of timing. If you make all three of these criteria you will probably be in early labor. Don't worry too much about not getting there in time. Most women will have contractions as close as 2 minutes apart as they enter the advanced stages of labor. If your water breaks, well, the 5:1:1 rule doesn't apply. Within a reasonable period of time you should go to the hospital. What is a reasonable period of time? Within a few hours. Don't stay at home for long periods of time waiting for contractions. If you aren't sure what to do, call Dr. Daum. He will help you decide how to proceed.

Patient Education

Am I in Labor?

Labor at term is about trying to decide if it is time to go to the hospital. If it is timed properly, it will prevent frustrating visits to the hospital which result in going back home. Many women have described a  contraction as "The baby balls up". What is really... Read More

What's with the NEW Pap Smear Guidelines?

With the advancement of DNA technology, it has been determined that 99% of cervical cancers are caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). There are many subtypes of HPV, and a small number have been detected in cervical cancers. These subtypes are called  high risk HPV subltypes. The highest risk types are types 16... Read More

Abnormal Pap Smear - Now What?

Many women will have an abnormal pap smear result at some point in their life. If you have had an abnormal pap smear, you will generally need to have a follow up pap smear within 6 months.  Potential results of a follow up pap smear are: - Your follow up pap smear... Read More

Essure Tubal Sterilization

There has been a good bit of advertising recently about the Essure method of tubal sterilization. Essure is not new, and has been on the market for a number of years. The Essure method of sterilization  requires placement of a device in each tubal opening, where it opens into the... Read More

American College of ObGYN Patient Information Website

The American College of ObGYN (ACOG) is the governing body for ObGYN doctors in America. They have created a very informative and helpful patient information page that covers a wide variety of topics for patients. If you have any questions about women's health, this website is a great resource. If... Read More

Hereditary Cancer Syndrome Screening Information

Anyone can be at increased risk for cancer based on their family history. This is especially true for certain types of cancers such as: breast, ovary, colon, endometrium (uterine), pancreas, and melanoma. The more unusual the timing of the cancer (early age onset) or prevalence within a family, the higher... Read More

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